Projects

METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORK

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Project Owner : Shyam.C
Created Date : Thu, 15/03/2012 - 19:41
Project Description :

The term metropolitan area refers to a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories, sharing industryinfrastructure, and housing. A metropolitan area usually comprises multiple jurisdictions andmunicipalitiesneighborhoodstownshipscitiesexurbscounties, and even states. As social, economic and political institutions have changed, metropolitan areas have become key economic and political regions.

 

A metropolitan area combines an urban agglomeration (the contiguous, built-up area) with zones not necessarily urban in character, but closely bound to the center by employment or other commerce. These outlying zones are sometimes known as a commuter belt, and may extend well beyond the urban zone, to other political entities. For example, El Monte, California is considered part of the Los Angeles' metro area.

In practice, the parameters of metropolitan areas, in both official and unofficial usage, are not consistent. Sometimes they are little different from an urban area, and in other cases they cover broad regions that have little relation to a single urban settlement; comparative statistics for metropolitan area should take this into account. Population figures given for one metro area can vary by millions, and there is a tendency for people to promote the highest figure available for their own "city". However the most ambitious metropolitan area population figures are often better seen as the population of a "metropolitan region" than of a "city".

There has been no significant change in the basic concept of metropolitan areas since its adoption in 1950, although significant changes in geographic distributions have occurred since then, and more are expected. Because of the fluidity of the term "metropolitan statistical area," the term used colloquially is more often "metro service area," "metro area," or "MSA" taken to include not only a city, but also surrounding suburban, exurban and sometimes rural areas, all which it is presumed to influence.

A polycentric metropolitan area is one not connected by continuous development or conurbation, which requires urban contiguity. In defining a metropolitan area, it is sufficient that a city or cities constitute a nucleus with which other areas have a high degree of integration.

 

Megalopolis

This concept of a "megalopolis" was first proposed by the French geographer Jean Gottmann in his book Megalopolis, a study of the northeastern United States. One prominent example of a megalopolis is the Northeast megalopolis consisting of BostonHartfordGreater New York CityPhiladelphiaWilmington, DelawareBaltimoreWashington, D.C., and their vicinities. Two other prominent megalopolises in North America are as follows:

 

In the United States a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is a geographical region with a relatively high population density at its core and close economic ties throughout the area. Such regions are not legally incorporated as a city or town would be, nor are they legal administrative divisions like counties or sovereign entities like states. As such the precise definition of any given metropolitan area can vary with the source. A typical metropolitan area is centered around a single large city that wields substantial influence over the region (e.g. Chicago). However, some metropolitan areas contain more than one large city with no single municipality holding a substantially dominant position (e.g. Minneapolis – Saint Paul).

MSAs are defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget only, and used by the U.S. Census Bureau and other U.S. government agencies for statistical purposes only.

 

Here is a list of metroplexes that overlap multiple countries:

 

Africa

 

Asia

 

Within the European Union

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